Welcome to New Wings
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NEW WINGS

Treatment Program

A multi-agency approach to support children in need

 

 

            New Wings is a day treatment program designed for troubled and at-risk youth aged 5-12.  Typically, children are referred for a variety of problems including anger/aggression, chronic disruptiveness, poor social skills, oppositional-defiant tendencies, and similar anti-social behaviors.  Due to the severity of these behaviors the students are at risk of "out-of-home" placement if there is no positive change.  To transform these behaviors parental involvement is not only important, but it is a requirement for inclusion in the program.  Parents must be willing to create a Family Service Plan with the social services case worker.  On this plan families have goals that are consistent with the individual goals the children have in school.  If these goals are worked on consistently in a variety of settings the negative behaviors are more apt to diminish.  The more involved a parent or family is in the program the more effective the change will be for the child.

 

            Upon entering New Wings students are initially taught the basic rules and expectations for behavior.  Invariably, however, these children who have emotional struggles will "act out" when they are angry.  They do not have the appropriate skills to express themselves when they are frustrated.  New Wings uses a multi-faceted model which includes not only learning more appropriate "replacement behaviors", but more importantly, healing from grief and trauma in a uniquely structured and supportive environment.  The children also have access to a therapist.  They meet for up to one hour a week outside of the classroom setting.  During that time they work on building relationships, trust, calming strategies, self-esteem, and family dynamics. 

 

All in all, the New Wings Staff are dedicated to helping children process their experiences and learn to express their emotions in more appropriate ways.  Finally, students are taught to evaluate their own progress through the use of self-monitoring rubrics which provide a mechanism for learning to take responsibility for one's own choices in life.