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STUDENT & SCHOOL SAFETY

There is nothing more important than keeping our students, teachers, and school communities safe, secure, and focused on teaching and learning. We work closely with school teams and area law enforcement agencies to protect our students, teachers, school leaders, and staff and to prevent emergencies before they arise.

Please make sure your child's school has the most accurate emergency contact information on file and talk to your child about the importance of following directions and listening to school staff during an emergency.

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SRP – Standard Response Protocol

Our District is expanding the safety program to include the Standard Response Protocol (SRP). The SRP is based on four actions: Lockout; Lockdown; Evacuate; and Shelter.

In the event of an emergency, the action and appropriate direction will be called on the intercom:

  • Lockout – “Secure the Perimeter”
  • Lockdown – “Locks, Lights, Out of Sight”
  • Evacuate – “To the Announced Location”
  • Shelter – “Using Announced Type and Method”

What to do during an Emergency:

Do not call the school, as we may need to keep the phone lines clear. Tune in to local radio stations for updates and instructions. Check our School or District website for any information or directions that have been posted: www.cortez.k12.co.us Please wait for the reverse auto dialer call from the district to inform you as to where and what time your student can be picked up. When the all clear is given for parents to pick up their child(ren), be prepared to show identification.

What you can do to help:

It is important that you inform the school office of any changes in your family’s work or home telephone numbers or emergency contact numbers. Our schools require visitors to check in at the office as soon as they enter the building. This allows us to keep an accurate record of who is in the building at all times. Whenever you will be visiting one of our schools, please sign in and get a visitor pass. Communication is important in the identification and prevention of potential issues. We encourage you to call and report any information that is related to the safety and welfare of students and staff in our schools. You can make a report directly to the MCSD Administration at 970-565-7522 or by calling Safe2Tell at 1-877-542-7233

Our schools conduct safety drills so that students know how to respond in an emergency situation. Our plan includes a safe and systematic method of returning your student to you. In the event of a local emergency, students may be bused to a central location for reunification with parents This information will be provided to families as soon as possible through Reverse 911 calls and information on the district website and school web pages. Please do not go to your child’s school, as you may not have access to campus.

The district works with area public-safety agencies to protect our schools and prevent emergencies before they arise. The district has an overall safety plan, and each school has a plan. Those plans are based on two highly effective programs:

  • The Standard Response Protocol from the “I Love U Guys” Foundation,
  • Safe2Tell.

The information and links below provide information about how we utilize these programs to keep students and staff safe.

SAFE 2 TELL COLORADO

Safe2Tell Colorado
Safe2Tell Colorado enables anyone to anonymously report anything that concerns or threatens them, their family and friends, their school, or their community. Safe2Tell also gives them an anonymous way to help someone who is hurting or struggling. Safe2Tell response teams follow up on every call.


To make a report, call 1-877-542-7233 from anywhere, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.


The call is free. You also may make a web-tip or download the Safe2Tell mobile app on the Apple App Store or Google Play. Remember, your identity is safe. No one will ask for your name or number. There is no caller ID, no call tracing, no call recording and no call forwarding. The anonymity of all Safe2Tell Colorado reports is protected by C.R.S. 07-197. This means the reporting party remains UNKNOWN by Colorado.

I LOVE YOU GUYS

I Love U Guys
The District uses a protocal from the “I Love U Guys” Foundation was started in 2006 by Ellen and John-Michael Keyes following a school shooting that took the life of their daughter, Emily. The Foundation is committed to school and community safety, and family reunification following a crisis. Its programs have been implemented by over 25,000 schools, agencies and organizations across the United States and Canada.

The Standard Response Protocol (SRP) is based not on individual scenarios but on the response to any given situation. The SRP is based on four actions:

  • Lockout
  • Lockdown
  • Evacuate
  • Shelter

 

Our schools conduct safety drills so that students know how to respond in an emergency situation. Our plan includes a safe and systematic method of returning your student to you.

In the event of a local emergency, students may be bused to a central location for reunification with parents. This information will be provided to families as soon as possible through Reverse 911 calls and information on the district website and school web pages.

Please do not go to your child’s school, as you may not have access to campus.

Anti-bullying

In the Montezuma-Cortez School District, all types of bullying are unacceptable. The district supports a secure school climate, conducive to teaching and learning that is free from threat, harassment and any type of bullying behavior.  If you feel your child is being bullied please contact your child's teacher and principal to report your concern.  They will work with you to resolve any issues. 

If after working with your child's teacher and principal you do not feel the issue has been addressed please contact the Superintendent's office at (970) 565-7522.  

What is bullying?

Bullying is the use of coercion or intimidation to obtain control over another person or to cause physical, mental or emotional harm to another person. Bullying can occur through written, verbal or electronically transmitted expression or by means of a physical act or gesture, and can happen at all school levels.

Bullying against any student is prohibited for any reason, including behavior directed toward a student because of academic performance, disability, race, creed, color, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, religion, ancestry, or the need for special education services, whether such characteristic is actual or perceived.

Bullying is prohibited on district property, at district or school-sanctioned activities and events, when students are being transported in any vehicle dispatched by the district or one of its schools, or off school property when such conduct has a nexus to school or any district curricular or non-curricular activity or event.

A student who engages in any act of bullying and/or a student who takes any retaliatory action against a student who reports in good faith an incident of bullying, is subject to appropriate disciplinary action including but not limited to suspension, expulsion and/or referral to law enforcement authorities.

The district’s comprehensive anti-bullying program includes the following components:

  • Sending a clear and consistent message to students, staff, parents and community members that bullying and retaliation against a student who reports bullying will not be tolerated.
  • Training for staff and students in taking proactive steps to prevent bullying from occurring. Implementing procedures for immediate intervention, investigation, and confrontation of students engaged in bullying behavior.
  • Initiating efforts to change the behavior of students engaged in bullying behaviors through re-education on acceptable behavior, discussions, counseling, and appropriate consequences.
  • Fostering a productive partnership with parents and community members in order to help maintain a bully-free environment.
  • Supporting victims of bullying by means of individual and peer counseling.
  • Helping develop peer support networks, social skills and confidence for all students.
  • Recognizing and praising positive, supportive behaviors of students toward one another on a regular basis.

The District has a clear anti-bullying policy, click here to learn more


Safe2Tell Colorado
Safe2Tell Colorado enables anyone to anonymously report anything that concerns or threatens them, their family and friends, their school, or their community. Safe2Tell also gives them an anonymous way to help someone who is hurting or struggling. Safe2Tell response teams follow up on every call.

To make a report, call 1-877-542-7233 from anywhere, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

To learn more about bullying and how to stop it visit. https://www.stopbullying.gov/

Safe2Tell Colorado

Safe2Tell Colorado enables anyone to anonymously report anything that concerns or threatens them, their family and friends, their school, or their community. Safe2Tell also gives them an anonymous way to help someone who is hurting or struggling. Safe2Tell response teams follow up on every call.

To make a report, call 1-877-542-7233 from anywhere, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Parent Awareness Series:
Talking to Your Kids About Suicide


From the Society for the Prevention of Teen Suicide, Inc.

Every parent would like to believe that suicide is not relevant to them or their family or friends. Unfortunately, it’s all too relevant for all of us. It’s the 3rd leading cause of death in adolescents and the 2nd for college aged students. Even more disturbing are national surveys that tell us that 25% of high school students admit to thinking about suicide and 8.5% acknowledge actually making an attempt. So how do you deal with this reality? You talk to your children about these other behaviors which can put them at personal risk and suicide is no different. It’s something you can and should talk about with your children.

Contrary to myth, talking about suicide cannot plant the idea in someone’s head. It actually can open up communication about a topic that is often kept a secret. And secrets that are exposed to the rational light of day often become less powerful and scary. You also give your child permission to bring up the subject again in the future.

If it isn’t prompted by something your kid is saying or doing that worries you, approach this topic in the same way as other subjects that are important to you but may or may not be important to your child:

  • Timing is everything. Pick a time when you have the best chance of getting your child’s attention. Sometimes a car ride, for example, assures you of a captive, attentive audience. Or a suicide that has received media attention can provide the perfect opportunity to bring up the topic.
  • Think about what you want to say ahead of time and rehearse a script if necessary. It always helps to have a reference point: (“I was reading in the paper that youth suicide has been increasing…”; or “I saw that your school is having a program for the teachers on suicide prevention”)
  • Be honest. If this a hard subject for you to talk about, admit it. (“You know, I never thought this was something I’d be talking with you about, but I think its really important”). By acknowledging your discomfort, you give your child permission to acknowledge his/her discomfort, too.
  • Ask for your child’s response. Be direct. (“What do you think about suicide?”; “Is it something that any of your friends talk about?”; “The statistics make it sound pretty common. Have you ever thought about it? What about your friends?”)
  • Listen to what your child has to say. You’ve asked the questions, so simply consider your child’s answers. If you hear something that worries you, be honest about that, too (“What you’re telling me has really gotten my attention and I need to think about it some more. Let’s talk about this again, okay?”)
  • Don’t overreact or under react. Overreaction will close off any future communication on the subject. Under reacting, especially in relation to suicide, is often just a way to make ourselves feel better. ANY thoughts or talk of suicide (“I felt that way a while ago but don’t any more”) should ALWAYS be revisited. Remember that suicide is an attempt to solve a problem that seems impossible to solve in any other way. Ask about the problem that created the suicidal thoughts. This can make it easier to bring up again in the future (“I wanted to ask you again about that situation you were telling me about…)

Here are some possible warning signs that should get our attention:

STATEMENTS that convey a sense of hopelessness, worthlessness, or preoccupation with death (“ Life doesn’t seem worth it sometimes”; “I wish I were dead”; “Heaven’s got to be better than this”)

BEHAVIORS that are different from the way your child acted in the past, especially things like talking about death or suicide, taking dangerous risks, withdrawing from activities or sports, or using alcohol or drugs.

FEELINGS that, again, seem different from the past like irritability, anxiety, sadness, hopelessness, loss of interest

SITUATIONS that can serve as ‘trigger points’ for suicidal behaviors. These include things like loss or death, getting in trouble at home, in school, or with the law, or impending changes for which your child feels scared or unprepared. If you notice any of these things in kids who have always been impulsive, made previous suicide attempts or threats, or seem vulnerable in any way, you really should get consultation from a mental health professional

© Society for the Prevention of Teen Suicide, Inc. | sptsnj.org Parent Awareness Series: Talking to Your Kids About Suicide

 

Safe2Tell Colorado

Safe2Tell Colorado enables anyone to anonymously report anything that concerns or threatens them, their family and friends, their school, or their community. Safe2Tell also gives them an anonymous way to help someone who is hurting or struggling. Safe2Tell response teams follow up on every call.

To make a report, call 1-877-542-7233 from anywhere, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Vaping and E-Cigarettes

 

Calling it Quits: Resources for Teenagers on Vaping and Nicotine Cessation 


New-- Resources to address electronic cigarettes

Use of electronic cigarettes continues to be a serious problem in Colorado and the nation. Resources are available to help address nicotine vaping, e-cigarette and other tobacco use among Colorado youth. E-cigarette use is not safe, especially for young people. Nicotine is highly addictive and can harm brain development. The U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams declared youth e-cigarette use an epidemic and encourages parents, teachers and lawmakers to take action. The following are immediate actions that schools can take to help reduce tobacco use:

  1. Strengthen and Communicate and Enforce Tobacco Free Schools Policies
  2. Provide Reliable and Accurate Education about Vaping
  3. Promote Quitting among Students and Staff
  4. Lend your voice to community efforts to reduce easy access to tobacco products among youth

Read the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment's Tobacco Free Schools Enforcement Strategies   (PDF – 123 KB). 

New-- Vaping and Lung Illness

Colorado is one of multiple states investigating severe lung illness associated with vaping. ​In line with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Colorado is reporting confirmed and probable cases. A confirmed case is someone who recently used a vaping product, developed a breathing illness, and for whom testing did not show an infection. While this investigation is ongoing and the definitive cause of reported illnesses remains uncertain, people should consider not using vaping products. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is investigating all cases reported to us to determine if they meet the case definition being used nationally. Colorado Vaping-Associated Illness Outbreak Report Note that, this report is updated weekly, on Wednesdays.

New-- What You Need to Know and How to Talk with Your Kids About Vaping

Although it has been around for over a decade, vaping’s popularity exploded in 2017, taking many families, schools and healthcare providers by surprise. Vaping, or Juuling as it is often referred to by teens and young adults (named after a popular vape device called JUUL), is the inhaling and exhaling of an aerosol produced by using a vape device. For every story or article touting the benefits of vaping, there are an equal number raising concerns about the risks of vaping, especially for teens and young adults. This guide is intended to help you understand what vaping is, its appeal to youth and what research has to say about both the risks and unknowns, due to the lack of long-term vaping studies. We’ve identified some signs to look for and what to do if you are concerned that your child may try or actually is vaping. Lastly, we offer some advice on what to say when talking with your child about vaping. What You Need to Know and How to Talk with Your Kids About Vaping  (PDF – 1.15 MB)

CDPHE - Letter to the Public on Vaping

  • The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) recently supplied a letter for school leaders to send to parents, community members and others about the health risks of vaping. In the letter, CDPHE suggests effective ways to inform students of the risks involved with e-cigarette and tobacco use.

Know the Risks - Surgeon General's Warnings on E - Cigarettes

  • The 2016 U.S. Surgeon General's Report on e-cigarrette use among youth and young adults is the first report issued by a Federal agency that comprehensively reviews the public health issue of electronic cigarettes and their impact on our nation's young people.
  • Resources include general introductions to what E-Cigarettes are, and why vaping is an issue of concern for parents and educators. 

Physician Advocacy Network

  • The Physician Advocacy Network has developed this vaping and JUULing curriculum for teachers and others to use to educate middle and high school students about the harms of vaping. Website contains lesson plan and supporting curriculum. 

Stanford Medicine Tobacco Prevention Toolkit 

  • This module provides an understanding of the inner workings of e-cigarettes, the content of the aerosols they produce, and thirdhand smoke. It's broken down into 5 units, each of which explore e-cigarettes in depth. 

E-Cigarrette Risk Fact Sheet

  • ​​This quick reference guide demonstrates the known risk factors of using electronic cigarettes. 

E- Cigarrettes, What You Need to Know

  • Printable quick reference on how e-cigarettes work, responsible use, and risk factors. 

Talking to Your Kids About Vaping

  • Guide to determining when, and how to talk to children about the risk factors of vaping and using electronic cigarettes. 

Back to Resources Index

 

"Calling it Quits: Resources for Teenagers on Vaping and Nicotine Cessation" here: https://www.publichealthdegrees.org/resources/teenagers-vaping-and-nicotine-cessation/
 


This information sourced from https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cssrc/vaping-and-e-cigarettes

Web Link Disclaimer: The Colorado School Safety Resource Center (CSSRC) provides links from this site to external websites because of their potential interest or usefulness to the safe and positive school environment, an education community or the general public. It attempts to monitor such sites on a regular basis. However, the CSSRC cannot be responsible for the content of any site external to its own. Further, by linking to other sites, the CSSRC is not endorsing any particular product, practice, service, provider or institution, nor does it necessarily endorse views expressed or facts presented on these sites. In addition, neither the CSSRC nor any of its employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information linked to from this site.

 

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